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About the Panelists

The Impact of Skin Color and Ethnicity on Clinical Diagnosis and Research

Sessions

Panelists will define and discuss hair disorders in people of color. External and systemic diseases can cause hair loss. Misdiagnosis often occurs when hair loss is considered cosmetic and not a medical problem. Ethnicity affects the significance and cultural meaning of hair loss, and physicians need to know how each patient is being affected. Hair disorders constitute a significant health problem and affect health care access because of the length and complexity of the visits.

Session 2: Thursday, November 12, 2020
Time: 1:00–2:15 PM ET / 10:00–11:15 AM PT

Upon completion of this webinar you will be able to:

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Define and describe the pathogenesis and research of the diagnosis and treatment of scarring and nonscarring hair disorders.

Illustrate how health disparities, structural racism, and implicit bias manifest in health education, diagnosis and treatment, and research regarding hair disorders.

Develop awareness, sensitivity, and competency in the cultural, socioeconomic, and health impact of hair in people of color.

Identify funding resources to increase the amount of research and training of residents in pathology and the use of diagnostic training tools.

Session 3: Wednesday, November 18, 2020
Time: 1:00–2:15 PM ET / 10:00–11:15 AM PT

Pigmentary disorders and keloids can be signs of systemic disease and can cause significant psychological impact and social ramifications. Panelists will discuss the breadth of pigmentary disorders, including vitiligo, melasma, and post-inflammatory hyperpigmentation, and utilize global scientific literature to update the audience on newer therapeutic options.

Upon completion of this webinar you will be able to:

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Define and discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of pigmentary disorders, including vitiligo.

Define and discuss the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of keloids and hypertrophic scarring.

Illustrate how keloids and pigmentary disorders have psychological, socioeconomic, and cultural impact, and increased health disparities in people of color.

Summarize global scientific literature on research and newer therapeutic options in pigmentary disorders.

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Session 4: Wednesday, December 2, 2020
Time: 1:00–2:15 PM ET / 10:00–11:15 AM PT

Panelists will focus on the challenges physicians face in recognizing systemic diseases in melanin-rich skin types. There can be delays and misdiagnosis of life-threatening diseases when color changes related to the disease are not recognized. The skin signs of Covid-19 comorbidities (i.e., diabetes and pulmonary disease) will be discussed in adults and children.

Upon completion of this webinar you will be able to:

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Describe the influence of skin color and ethnicity on implicit bias in the physical exam and impact on health disparities.

Recognize and diagnose hypoxemia, anemia, erythema, and other systemic color changes in the skin that reflect health and disease in darker skin types.

Describe and identify the skin manifestations of Covid-19 and Covid-related comorbidities in adults.

Describe and identify skin manifestations of Covid-19 and related comorbidities in children.

Explain the need for awareness of cultural sensitivities and the need for cultural competency training in all curriculum.

Propose skin of color dermatology curriculum to train first-line providers to recognize the cutaneous manifestations of systemic diseases.

A VIRTUAL SERIES: OCTOBER 28–DECEMBER 2, 2020

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A VIRTUAL SERIES:
OCTOBER 28 – DECEMBER 28, 2020

Join clinical experts, thought leaders, and advocates for a collaborative discussion on the issues of health disparities, structural racism, and medicine as we examine specific dermatologic diseases in a series of four free and open educational webinars. 

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Structural Racism and Racial Bias in Medicine: Wednesday, October 28, 1:00-2:15 PM ET

Hair Disorders in People of Color: Thursday, November 12, 1:00-2:15 PM ET

Pigmentary Disorders and Keloids: Wednesday, November 18, 1:00-2:15 PM ET

Covid-19 Comorbidities and Cutaneous Manifestations of Systemic Diseases in Adults and Children: Wednesday, December 2, 1:00-2:15 PM ET

Implicit bias and structural racism play a central role in the development of health care disparities. One of the critically important areas in medicine is the misdiagnosis of disease in people with darker skin types due to implicit bias and the lack of awareness among physicians in recognizing the disease pattern. Clinicians in primary care, emergency medicine, hospital medicine, surgery, pediatrics, and other medical specialties can deliver improved care if they can recognize and diagnose medical conditions based on skin findings in patients of color. This four-part series aims to improve diagnosis in people of color, describe pathogenesis and treatment of diseases, develop cultural competency, and impact change in health care policy so more is done to reduce racial bias in medical practice and medical research. Providing this education, in turn, will ultimately help reduce health disparities and improve the lives of underrepresented minority populations.

This event series is brought to you by the Skin of Color Society Foundation (a nonprofit, with a mission of education, mentoring, and research in skin of color), NEJM Group, and VisualDx (the leading visual clinical decision support system).

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We would like to thank Zoom Video Communications for its in-kind support of this webinar series.

Disparities in health care exist because of socioeconomic factors, structural racism, and implicit bias. Panelists will identify the problems and discuss what solutions are in place that could improve health disparities such as medical education, more training for underrepresented minority physicians, more funding for research, and fast-tracking publication of research. Furthermore, panelists will explore how the field of dermatology and other medical specialties can address these issues.

Session 1: Wednesday, October 28, 2020
Time: 1:00–2:15 PM ET / 10:00–11:15 AM PT

Upon completion of this webinar you will be able to:

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Illustrate how health disparities and structural racism historically manifest in health education, diagnosis and treatment, and research.

Summarize solutions and methods to improve health disparities such as medical education, more training for underrepresented minority physicians, more funding for research, and fast-tracking research publications.

Identify innovative programs in the field of dermatology and other medical specialties that are successfully addressing these issues.

Discuss the need for more scientific research in skin of color, the benefits of diversifying researchers, and ways to encourage people of color and physicians of color to participate in research trials.

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This session was held on October 28, 2020. Check back here for links to the recording!

Susan Saulny launched her reporting career while still an undergraduate at Yale University, working for her hometown New Orleans newspaper, the Times-Picayune. After graduating from Yale with a degree in Political Science, Saulny worked for the Washington Post as a feature writer and also earned a graduate degree from the London School of Economics. She spent most of her reporting career as a national correspondent for the New York Times, where she covered the 9/11 terrorist attacks from Ground Zero, Hurricane Katrina from New Orleans, and multiple presidential campaigns on the road all around the country.

Susan Saulny

Susan C. Taylor, MD, a physician educated at Harvard, Columbia, and University of Pennsylvania, as well as a diplomat of the American Board of Internal Medicine and the American Board of Dermatology, has been at the forefront of scientific research, clinical care, and education for the dermatologic health of populations of Africans, Asians, Latinos, and Native Americans. Her foremost scholarly achievements in the field of dermatology include the establishment and leadership of the subspecialty within dermatology, Skin of Color dermatology; the founding of the Skin of Color Center at St. Luke’s Hospital Center in New York in 1998, a first of its kind in the nation; the creation of the Skin of Color Society in 2004; and the groundbreaking textbook, Dermatology for Skin of Color, co-authored with Dr. A. Paul Kelly in 2009. She is currently the Sandra Lazarus Professor of Dermatology at the Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Taylor’s areas of concentration include pigmentary disorders and other disorders that uniquely or disproportionately affect those of color; alopecias and other hair disorders; cosmetics and enhancing devices; skin cancers; and cultural competency. She is the vice chair of Diversity, Equity and Inclusion for the department of dermatology at the Perelman School of Medicine, where she promotes and facilitates diversity and inclusion excellence across the department. She actively supports and guides underrepresented medical students through participation in mentorship programs. Additionally, she is actively engaged in the American Academy of Dermatology and is the vice president. Her other passions include volunteerism, traveling, and art.

Susan C. Taylor, MD
Henry W. Lim, MD

Henry W. Lim, MD, is the former chair of the Department of Dermatology, Henry Ford Hospital, and senior vice president for academic affairs, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan. He received his MD (cum laude) from SUNY Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York, and completed his dermatology residency at New York University School of Medicine.

Dr. Lim has served as president of the American Academy of Dermatology, American Board of Dermatology, American Dermatological Association, American Society for Photobiology, International Union of Photobiology, and National Council on Skin Cancer Prevention. In 2019, he was elected as a board member of the International League of Dermatological Societies. He has been recognized with the Fred W. Whitehouse, MD, Distinguish Career Award of the Henry Ford Medical Group, European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology International Scientific Achievement Award, International League of Dermatological Societies Certificate of Appreciation for International Leadership, Finsen Medal from the International Union of Photobiology, and Alumni Achievement Award for Distinguished Service to American Medicine, College of Medicine, SUNY Downstate.

He has published more than 500 articles, edited 8 textbooks, and served on editorial boards of several journals. He is a recognized world authority on photodermatology.

Maritza Perez, MD

Maritza Perez, MD, is a visiting professor of dermatology at the University of Connecticut School of Medicine and the owner of a solo private practice, Advanced Aesthetics in New Canaan, Connecticut. She graduated and completed her residency in dermatology from University of Puerto Rico School of Medicine. Dr. Perez completed a fellowship in immunodermatology from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York, New York and a fellowship in dermatologic surgery from New York University Langone Medical Center.

Dr. Perez is currently an officer and former senior vice president of the Skin Cancer Foundation and former associate director of procedural dermatology at Mt. Sinai Beth Israel in New York, NY. She is a member of the board of directors for the Skin of Color Society and a member of the American Academy of Dermatology Association task force on cancer in skin of color.

Dr. Perez is the author of over 100 publications and co-authored Understanding Melanoma: What You Need to Know, now in its fifth edition.

Amy McMichael, MD

Amy McMichael, MD, is a Philadelphia native who received her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine. She completed her internship at Thomas Jefferson University Hospital in Philadelphia and her Dermatology residency training at the University of Michigan School of Medicine.

Dr. McMichael has been a faculty member at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center since 1994. She is currently professor and chair of the Department of Dermatology at Wake Forest School of Medicine. She also served as the residency director of the department for 12 years. Dr. McMichael’s clinical and research interests include hair and scalp disorders and skin of color. She is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology and a past chair of the Skin of Color Society and the National Medical Association Dermatology Section. She has served as vice president of the Women’s Dermatologic Society and secretary/treasurer of the North American Alopecia Research Society. She currently serves as a member of the Board of the American Academy of Dermatology. She is co-editor of the text Hair Diseases: Medical, Surgical, and Cosmetic Treatments, serves on the editorial boards of JAMA Dermatology, Cosmetic Dermatology, and The Dermatologist, and is the author of numerous journal articles and chapters. She is also an active member of the Greensboro Medical Society.

Prof Ncoza Dlova

Ncoza Dlova, MBChB, FCDerm, PhD, is the dean of the School of Clinical Medicine and head of the Dermatology Department at the University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN), Durban, South Africa. She is the only female dean among the nine medical schools deans, and one of the first African female dermatologists in South Africa. She has trained and mentored more than 40 dermatologists, many of whom have started and are heading well-established successful public hospital skin clinics. She is an internationally acclaimed dermatologist, and well recognized in South Africa and Africa at large, with a PhD focusing on ethnic skin and hair. She has many accolades and awards behind her name; recently she was awarded a leadership award as the Best Dean Leader in her college. She has published more than 85 scientific publications in peer-reviewed journals, and is a National Research Foundation-rated researcher with more than 15 chapters in international dermatology textbooks and two dermatology books that depict and are relevant to South Africans and Black skin. She is a member of numerous international dermatology boards and societies including Global Psoriasis Atlas, International Eczema Society, Skin of Color Society in the USA, African Hair and International Hair Groups. She has been invited as guest speaker in more than 30 countries. She is the member of the American Dermatology Association and recipient of the 2019 Maria Duran award from the International Society of Dermatology. In 2019, she received numerous awards for her leadership as the first African dean at the School of Clinical Medicine at UKZN. She represents Africa as an associate member of the board of the International League of Dermatology Society, the largest body of dermatology societies in the world.

Andrew F. Alexis, MD, MPH

Andrew F. Alexis, MD, MPH, is the chair of the Department of Dermatology at Mount Sinai Morningside and Mount Sinai West. He is also professor of dermatology at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. As director of the Skin of Color Center, he is actively involved in advancing patient care, research, and education pertaining to dermatologic disorders that are prevalent in ethnic skin. Dr. Alexis received his medical degree from Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons and his master of public health at Columbia University’s Mailman School of Public Health. He completed his dermatology residency at Weill Cornell Medical Center, followed by a fellowship in dermatopharmacology at New York University School of Medicine.

Dr. Alexis has published more than 90 articles in peer-reviewed journals including the British Journal of Dermatology, Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, and Archives of Dermatology, among others. He has co-edited two textbooks on dermatology for skin of color, Skin of Color: A Practical Guide to Dermatologic Diagnosis and Treatment and Ethnic Dermatology: Principles and Practice, and authored over 10 book chapters.

Dr. Alexis has held numerous leadership positions in professional organizations including past president of the New York Dermatological Society, past president of the New York Academy of Medicine Dermatology Section, secretary/treasurer of the Skin of Color Society, and chair of the Diversity Task Force Committee for the American Academy of Dermatology. He currently serves as co-chair of the Scientific Committee of the Skin of Color Society, and is a member of the board of directors of the American Dermatological Association and the Cicatricial Alopecia Research Foundation.

Dr. Alexis has appeared on ABC, CBS, NBC, and FOX television news programs and has been quoted in numerous leading publications, including the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Forbes, Allure, and Essence. He is listed in Castle Connolly’s Top Doctors and Super Doctors.

Pearl E. Grimes, MD

Pearl E. Grimes, MD, is the founder and director of the Vitiligo and Pigmentation Institute of Southern California. She is a pioneer and a leading international authority on vitiligo and pigmentary disorders.

Dr. Grimes is a clinical professor of Dermatology at the David Geffen School of Medicine, University of California — Los Angeles. She has authored more than 100 professional articles and abstracts, and two textbooks.

Dr. Grimes holds numerous achievements in dermatology. She has been recognized by her peers with the prestigious Dermatology Foundation “Practitioner of the Year” award and the Women’s Dermatologic Society’s “Mentor of the Year” award in 2011. She received the American Society of Dermatologic Surgery President’s Award in 2006. In 2016, she was recognized with an American Skin Association Research Achievement Award. She was also awarded the prestigious 2017 Arnold P. Gold Foundation Humanism in Medicine Award and the 2017 Everett C. Fox, MD Memorial Award and Lectureship Award. In addition, she was the recipient of the prestigious Lifetime Achievement Award from the American Skin Association for 2017.

She is an active member of multiple professional organizations including the American Academy of Dermatology, the American Society of Dermatologic Surgery, the American Dermatological Association, the Society of Investigative Dermatology, the Dermatology Foundation, the International Federation of Pigment Cell Societies, the International Peeling Society, and the Women’s Dermatologic Society. Dr. Grimes was the president of the Women’s Dermatologic Society for 2018–2019. She has been included in Los Angeles magazine’s Super Doctors list and the Best Doctors of America list for many years.

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Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD

Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD, is a diplomate of the American Board of Dermatology and a board-certified dermatologist. He graduated with honors from Emory University. He received his medical training at Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Georgia, and received his doctor of medicine degree magna cum laude with honors.

Following medical school, Dr. Desai completed his medical internship in internal medicine. He then went on to complete his residency at the University of Alabama at Birmingham and served as chief resident for the Department of Dermatology.

Dr. Desai has been active on local, state, and national levels with numerous medical organizations. His major accomplishments have been with the American Academy of Dermatology and the American Medical Association, where he has held numerous elected and appointed positions. He is also actively involved in teaching and mentoring medical students and residents. He currently serves as clinical assistant professor of dermatology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center.

Dr. Desai is the author of numerous publications and has been invited to present at numerous international dermatology events. He is a world-renowned expert on the treatment of vitiligo and other disorders of pigmentation, psoriasis, acne, cosmeceuticals and phototherapy.

Dr. Desai is very active in the local and national dermatologic communities. He is the immediate past president of the Skin of Color Society and immediate past president of the Texas Dermatological Society. In addition, he is a past president of the Dallas/Fort Worth Dermatological Society. He has also served on the board of directors of SkinPAC and currently is on the AAD Congressional Policy Committee. He is also immediate past chair of the AAD Leadership Development Steering Committee. Dr. Desai was elected to the AAD board of directors and represents the interests of more than 20,000 dermatologists worldwide. Dr. Desai was also appointed to serve on the US Food & Drug Administration’s Pharmacy Compounding Advisory Committee and is the only dermatologist on this important hearing committee. He also serves as the associate editor of the Journal of Clinical and Aesthetic Dermatology and Pigment International, while also serving on numerous editorial advisory boards.

Donald A. Glass, II, MD, PhD

Donald A. Glass II, MD, PhD: Originally from the Bahamas, Dr. Glass enrolled in the Medical Scientist Training Program at Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) in 1998. He received his PhD from BCM in 2005 from the Department of Human Genetics where he studied the role of Canonical Wnt Signaling in Bone Regulation. He received his MD from BCM in 2006 and completed his transitional year internship at Cambridge Hospital in Massachusetts in 2008. Dr. Glass completed his residency training in dermatology and a postdoctoral fellowship in the McDermott Center (with Dr. Helen Hobbs) at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. He is board certified by the American Board of Dermatology.

Dr. Glass's main research interest is in understanding how keloids (exuberant scarring of the skin) occur and in finding the genes that predispose people to develop keloids. Keloids occur disproportionately more often in skin of color, and the ability to develop keloids can be inherited within families. Dr. Glass is compiling a registry of individuals and families affected by keloids in order to collect samples and information to study keloids further. His other research interest is identifying genes that cause rare skin disorders. Dr. Glass practices general dermatology and has an interest in genetic skin disorders.

Lynn McKinley-Grand, MD, FAAD

Lynn McKinley-Grant, MD, FAAD, is an associate professor of dermatology at Howard University College of Medicine and former vice chair of Diversity and Community Engagement in Dermatology at Duke University School of Medicine. She is a graduate of Harvard Medical School and completed her internal medicine residency at Boston City Hospital, her dermatology residency at New York University, and a Molecular Biology Fellowship at the National Cancer Institute. Dr. McKinley-Grant is board-certified in dermatology and internal medicine, and is an author, researcher, and lecturer. 

As an innovator in medicine, Dr. McKinley-Grant worked at the Albert Schweitzer Hospital in Gabon, Africa, early in her medical career. She founded the Bellevue Hospital Hansen's Disease (Leprosy) clinic and researched and identified the skin protein filaggrin while at the National Institutes of Health. Dr. McKinley-Grant continues to be passionate about new ideas that improve the quality of health care in underrepresented minorities by training doctors to make accurate diagnoses in skin of color. 

Dr. McKinley-Grant has always trained residents and has mentored many students, residents, and faculty. She is currently serving as the president of the Skin of Color Society (2019–2021). She is a member of the National Medical Association, the American Academy of Dermatology, the Society of Investigative Dermatology, the American Dermatology Association, and the Women's Dermatology Society. She is also the former chair of the diversity and mentoring committee of the American Academy of Dermatology. 

Dr. McKinley-Grant has practiced dermatology for over 25 years in the Washington, DC, area and in Durham, North Carolina. Since 1992, she has been listed in Washingtonian Magazine as one of the Top Doctors in the area, as selected by other physicians. Dr. McKinley-Grant is the co-senior editor of VisualDx: Essential Dermatology in Pigmented Skin. She has authored several publications and has contributed to the second edition of the textbook Dermatology for Skin of Color by Paul Kelly MD, and Susan C. Taylor, MD. 

In 2013, she co-founded the Insight Institute, a nonprofit organization that promotes innovation, critical thinking, and creative problem solving through art-based initiatives and programs, from medical training to business management. She has developed art and medicine curricula to train health care providers to develop a tolerance for ambiguity and recognize the humanity in all patients through empathy and cultural competency. She is currently on the board of trustees of the Colby Art Museum.

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Candrice R. Heath, MD, is a highly respected triple board-certified dermatologist. She is board certified in dermatology, pediatrics, and pediatric dermatology. She enjoys providing care to entire families, from newborn to 115 years of age. Dr. Heath was motivated to pursue a career in dermatology after witnessing her sister cope with the social hardships that come with having a green birthmark (Nevus of Ota) on one side of her face. Her professional and personal purpose is to help her patients embrace beauty, both inside and out. Her unique approach to dermatology services remains in high demand for both adults and children. 

After receiving her undergraduate degree from Wake Forest University, Dr. Heath earned her medical degree from the University of Virginia. She is the first person in her family to graduate from medical school. She then completed her pediatric internship at SUNY Downstate in New York City and a pediatric residency at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, and she practiced as a general pediatrician in urgent care and pediatric emergency department settings. Before going on to further her medical education in adult and pediatric dermatology, she completed two dermatology clinical research fellowships, one with Dr. Susan C. Taylor in Philadelphia, PA, and the other at Northwestern University with Dr. Amy Paller. Dr. Heath then completed her dermatology residency training at Mt. Sinai-St. Luke’s Roosevelt in New York, NY, followed by a pediatric dermatology fellowship at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Maryland. Currently, Dr. Heath is an assistant professor of dermatology at the Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University in Philadelphia, PA, where she thoroughly enjoys working with her colleagues, residents, medical students, and — most of all — her patients. 

Dr. Heath once worked in the Temple Pediatric Emergency Department as a pediatrician and returned as a dermatologist eight years later. Temple University Hospital not only serves the underserved but has world-class physicians delivering patient care. During the height of the coronavirus pandemic, Temple University Hospital took care of the highest number of Covid-19 patients in the city. Dr. Heath even spent time on the front lines taking care of Covid-19 patients in the hospital while outpatient services were very limited. 

Dr. Heath has been involved in dermatological clinical research, has published several scientific journal articles and textbook chapters, and continues to lecture nationally. Her interests include but are not limited to disorders that present uniquely in skin of color, the patient experience, atopic dermatitis, and hair disorders. She currently serves as associate editor of the medical journal Cutis. She was also recently appointed to the Lewis Katz School of Medicine Status of Women Faculty Committee. 

Dr. Heath is a fellow of the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD) and the American Academy of Pediatrics. She is a member of the National Medical Association, the Society for Pediatric Dermatology, the Pediatric Dermatology Research Alliance, and the Association of Professors of Dermatology. Dr. Heath has held leadership positions in the Women’s Dermatologic Society, the Delaware Academy of Dermatology, and the Skin of Color Society. She actively serves on the AAD Diversity Committee, the AAD Skin of Color Resident Education Curriculum Task Force, and the Skin of Color Society board of directors. She has also been a national board member for three nonprofit organizations including the Student National Medical Association. Nationally, she is a well sought-after speaker due to her triple-board certified expertise in dermatology for children and adults, her charismatic delivery, and her commitment to education. 

Candrice R. Heath, MD
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Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD

Dhaval Desai, MD,was raised in Atlanta, Georgia, and completed his undergraduate studies at Emory University. He completed medical school at American University of the Caribbean School of Medicine in St. Maarten. He completed his residency at Wright State University School of Medicine in Dayton, Ohio in combined Internal Medicine & Pediatrics and became Board Certified in Internal Medicine & Pediatrics in 2012. After briefly working in Ohio, he joined Emory Saint Joseph's Hospital in 2012 as a Hospitalist, and now serves as the Medical Director of Hospital Medicine. Dhaval also works at CHOA several times per year as a Pediatric Hospitalist. As Medical Director of Hospital Medicine, he has developed a passion for optimizing and enriching the patient and human experience in medicine.

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Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD

Kimberly D. Manning, MD, is a general internist/hospitalist who serves as Associate Vice Chair of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion for the Department of Medicine at Emory University School of Medicine. Manning is Professor of Medicine and additionally serves as residency program director for the Transitional Year Residency Program at Emory. Beyond her roles in the Department of Medicine, she has been a society small group advisor at the Emory since their curriculum reform in 2007. Dr. Manning continues to hold this position and currently co-leads the Semmelweis Society—one of the four academic houses in the medical school.

Manning’s academic achievements include numerous institutional, regional and national teaching awards. She has a strong passion for building and strengthening diverse clinical learning environments as well as cultivating psychologically safe learning climates. In 2018, she was awarded the prestigious ACGME Parker J. Palmer Courage To Teach Award—given to only 9 program directors across all ACGME residency programs in the US. At Emory, she has received the Evangeline Papageorge Award, The Golden Apple Teaching Award, and the Juha P. Kokko Teaching Award—the highest teaching awards in the School of Medicine, Grady Hospital, and Emory’s Internal Medicine Residency Program, respectively.

The Inglewood, California native is a proud alumnus of of two historically Black colleges--both Tuskegee University and Meharry Medical College--and is a happily married mother of two teen-aged sons. She applies her lived experiences as a Black woman, mother, daughter, wife, and community member to all that she does professionally.

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Seemal R. Desai, MD, FAAD

Dr. Titilola Sode is a Board-Certified Dermatologist in Dallas, Texas at U.S. Dermatology Partners Dallas Hillcrest and U.S. Dermatology Partner Dallas Presbyterian.

Dr. Sode originally hails from Miami, Florida. She earned her medical degree from Georgetown University School of Medicine in Washington, DC, where she was awarded several academic scholarships. During her medical education, she also completed a prestigious research fellowship at the University of Miami where she gained expertise in pigmented lesions and non-invasive techniques for early skin cancer detection, such as dermoscopy. Dr. Sode completed her Internal Medicine internship and Dermatology residency at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas, Texas. During her time in residency, she utilized her leadership skills to manage a free Dermatology clinic for the surrounding underserved communities. After residency, Dr. Sode completed a fellowship in Dermatopathology at Propath in Dallas, Texas. As a fellow, she expanded her knowledge of cutaneous disorders, presented research at scientific meetings, and actively participated in graduate medical education. Dr. Sode has multiple publications in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, Journal of Cutaneous Pathology, and has been featured in several textbooks. She is an active member of the American Academy of Dermatology, the Women’s Dermatology Society, the Skin of Color Society, Texas Medical Society, and the Dallas Medical Society.

Over the course of her career, Dr. Sode was very fortunate to work with world leaders in “skin of color” and is very comfortable treating patients of all ethnic backgrounds. In addition to treating a diverse patient population, Dr. Sode has considerable expertise in dermatopathology, hair loss, and cosmeceuticals. Additionally, she strongly believes in wholistic Dermatologic care, recognizing that skin issues can affect patients in ways that are not always outwardly visible. She strives to be compassionate to the psychosocial issues affecting her patients and consider all related concerns in her treatment plans.

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Sessions 1 and 2 are now available to watch. Follow the links below to the view the recorded events.

Recorded Sessions Now Available

Jenna Lester, MD, is a board-certified dermatologist working in San Francisco, California. Dr. Lester is an assistant professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF), where she practices and teaches general dermatology and is the founding director of the Skin of Color Program within the department of dermatology at UCSF. Now, under Dr. Lester’s leadership, the UCSF Skin of Color Clinic is mission-driven to address disparities in health care by focusing on meeting the unique dermatologic needs of underserved patients of color. The goal is to provide a comfortable place where individuals with skin of color can be treated by a dermatologist who fully understands how to recognize and treat their conditions with medical expertise and cultural sensitivity. One day, she hopes to expand the clinic to educate and train other dermatologists about how to treat patients of color and conduct further research into skin of color issues.

She joins many colleagues in the field with the expressed hope that someday soon, medical students and dermatologists-in-training will be educated about treating skin of color as a “fully integrated part of the dermatology curriculum, including visual examples of dermatologic conditions in educational materials shown side-by-side with other skin types to illustrate the different visual manifestations of various conditions in patients of color, rather than these examples being available only in a separate textbook."

Dr. Lester is a sought-after lecturer, has written book chapters and published articles in peer-reviewed journals, and is currently building an academic research program in dermatology.

Dr. Lester is a graduate of Harvard University and The Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University. She completed residency training in dermatology at UCSF and is board-certified in dermatology.

Candrice R. Heath, MD
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